STRAY PIT BULL MIX CARRIES INJURED FRIEND AROUND IN HER MOUTH - "It’s not every day we get to see such devotion between two special dogs like this…"

An animal control officer in Savannah, Georgia, discovered a Pit Bull mix named Joanie carrying an injured Chihuahua named Chachi around on the streets. Chachi had a serious eye injury and Joanie would periodically put Chachi down and lick the wound. Veterinarians later had to remove Chachi’s eye. The dogs are under supervision of the Savannah Chatham Animal Control shelter, but the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department has indicated that they will be adopted as a pair by a family in Florida. Read more from WBTW:

The dogs were found roaming a Savannah neighborhood on Thursday, July 17.

"Jonie," a large, white lab-Pit Bull mix was walking around with her injured Chihuahua pal "Chachi" in her mouth.

Jonie would stop occasionally to lick Chachi’s injured and swollen eye.

"Clearly, Chachi appreciated the attention," said a post on the Savannah-Chatham Police Department’s Facebook page.

Animal control officers caught the pair and took them to the shelter where the veterinary staff treated little Chachi.

The Chihuahua’s ruptured eye was too damaged to save, so veterinarians removed it.

On Tuesday, Jonie was allowed to visit Chachi. The shelter’s staff were treated to an emotional reunion, complete with licking, whining and cuddling.

"It’s not every day we get to see such devotion between two special dogs like this," said Animal Control Officer Christina Sutherin.

Joanie did her best to protect Chachi, and now they will finally have a chance at a new life together. Click here for the full story. (Photos from the Savannah-Chatham Metropolitan Police Department Facebook page)

MACHINE ALLOWS PEOPLE TO FEED STRAY DOGS BY RECYCLING PLASTIC

A company called Pugedon in Turkey has set up a machine which allows people to feed stray dogs by recycling plastic bottles. When a bottle is inserted, kibble is distributed to the dog. See the machine in action in the video.

OLDEST DOG IN THE UK PASSES AWAY AT AGE 23 - Daisy died last Thursday, aged 23 years and six months. She had been the oldest dog in the UK.”

A Jack Russell mix named Daisy was adopted from a shelter by the Barsby-Finch family when she was just six months old. Sadly, she recently passed away at the age of 23 1/2. She was the oldest dog in the United Kingdom. Read more from the Gloucestershire Echo:

The Jack Russell cross from Bishop’s Cleeve had become a “member of the family”, providing years of comfort for Mark Barsby-Finch and his elderly mother, Beryl.

Sadly, Daisy died last Thursday, aged 23 years and six months. She had been the oldest dog in the UK.

Tributes were yesterday to the loving dog which joined the family as a pup, just six months old.

***

Before old age took her, Daisy would every morning running about the fields in Staverton village, where Mark grew up.

And they never had to worry about her not coming back to the house.

“She knows where home is,” Mark said.

“She would always come back in the evening. We were worried at first, but quite soon we realised she would always come home.

“Most people have pets for 10 to 12 years, but to have one for such a long time is incredible.

“She became part of the family and really, our little baby. Even as she got older, she needed more caring for, but she was a huge member of this family.

“We will all miss her. It has been a lot quieter and when I hear noises, I still think she is coming down the hall way.

“I used to prepare meals for three, but now it’s only two. It’s just the little things.

“It’s nice to think she is now in doggie heaven.”

Sounds like Daisy lived a life full of love. RIP. Click here for the full story.

WOMAN SAVES NEIGHBOR’S DOG FROM PACK OF COYOTES - “I ran outside screaming as loud as I could and shooed the coyotes away.”
A woman named Dolores Jefferson in Illinois saw her neighbor’s dog, Roxie, being attacked by a pack of coyotes in her yard. Jefferson ran out screaming and drove the coyotes away. Roxie suffered an injury on her nose, but was otherwise ok. Roxie is a ten-year-old Cirneco dell’Etna dog. Here’s more from the Daily Herald:

Dolores “Dolly” Jefferson was getting some coffee about 11:30 a.m. Friday in the back room of her house near White Pines Golf Course when she “heard all kinds of commotion” in her backyard and saw her neighbor’s dog being attacked by a coyote.
"I looked out and saw Roxie had been bitten on the snout and the biggest coyote I’ve ever seen was chasing her around the pool and toward a pack of three more coyotes," Jefferson said. "My son has always told me to scream and yell real loud if I see a coyote and that’s what I did. I ran outside screaming as loud as I could and shooed the coyotes away."
Roxie’s owner, Rich Parent, who lives immediately behind Jefferson, said he was splitting logs in his backyard and didn’t hear the 10-year-old Cirneco dog’s cries. But Jefferson’s yelling caught his attention.
"She ran out screaming and got within a foot of Roxie and that 100-pound coyote and she chased that coyote out of here," Parent said Tuesday. "Dolly’s quite a hero. She saved Roxie’s life."

Thanks to her brave neighbor, Roxie survived her scary ordeal. Click here for the full story. (Photo by Mark Black)

WOMAN SAVES NEIGHBOR’S DOG FROM PACK OF COYOTES - I ran outside screaming as loud as I could and shooed the coyotes away.”

A woman named Dolores Jefferson in Illinois saw her neighbor’s dog, Roxie, being attacked by a pack of coyotes in her yard. Jefferson ran out screaming and drove the coyotes away. Roxie suffered an injury on her nose, but was otherwise ok. Roxie is a ten-year-old Cirneco dell’Etna dog. Here’s more from the Daily Herald:

Dolores “Dolly” Jefferson was getting some coffee about 11:30 a.m. Friday in the back room of her house near White Pines Golf Course when she “heard all kinds of commotion” in her backyard and saw her neighbor’s dog being attacked by a coyote.

"I looked out and saw Roxie had been bitten on the snout and the biggest coyote I’ve ever seen was chasing her around the pool and toward a pack of three more coyotes," Jefferson said. "My son has always told me to scream and yell real loud if I see a coyote and that’s what I did. I ran outside screaming as loud as I could and shooed the coyotes away."

Roxie’s owner, Rich Parent, who lives immediately behind Jefferson, said he was splitting logs in his backyard and didn’t hear the 10-year-old Cirneco dog’s cries. But Jefferson’s yelling caught his attention.

"She ran out screaming and got within a foot of Roxie and that 100-pound coyote and she chased that coyote out of here," Parent said Tuesday. "Dolly’s quite a hero. She saved Roxie’s life."

Thanks to her brave neighbor, Roxie survived her scary ordeal. Click here for the full story. (Photo by Mark Black)

NEW DOG PARK OPENS AT MISSION VALLEY MALL 

The grand opening was held on July 17th for a new dog park at the Mission Valley Mall in San Diego. The new park, located near Macy’s, is 300-square-feet in size and features synthetic grass, automatic water stations, and benches. The San Diego Humane Society and SPCA already has several events scheduled for the new dog park. Looks like a great place to play! (Photos by Kevin Andrew Falk)

THE TRANSFORMATION OF A NEGLECTED DOG - When we first saw this dog in it’s cage, we didn’t know which end was front or back. We had to get a treat to see which end lifted up to sniff.”

The Trio Animal Foundation recently rescued a badly neglected dog, now named Ellen, from a cage in the Chicago area. The dog’s fur was extremely matted and soaked with urine. A groomer named Kelli from the Mutt Hutt helped shave Ellen and gave her a bath. Ellen was taken to the vet for treatment and is currently in a foster home. Applications for Ellen’s adoption are available through Project Rescue Chicago. Read more from the Trio Animal Foundation Facebook page:

Kelli, a veteran groomer at Mutt Hutt, agreed to come into work very early this morning to see what she could do to help. Without Kelli’s generous offer, I am not sure what we would have done. The amount of grooming tools that she had to use to break through the hard shell of fur was unbelievable. 

Within the first ten minutes we found out that our matted pup was a girl… we have now named her Ellen. For the next hour and a half, I held Ellen and Kelli quickly worked to shave the heavy casing of fur away from Ellen’s body. Even though we had to pull out fur that had grown 2 inches down Ellen’s ear canal and shave matted fur away from her irritated paper-thin skin, never once did Ellen growl or show her teeth. When it came time to shave the matted fur that had tightly wrapped its way around Ellen’s raw legs like a snug boot, Ellen actually looked up at me and started to give me kisses… I could have died. Even better, the first time that she could feel the touch of my hand on her newly shaven back… she looked me in the eyes and it was as if she was saying thank you… her past abuse was literally being shaved away. In fact, 2 POUNDS of fur was shaved away!

Once almost all of Ellen’s fur was shaved off, she was given a bath and then one more trim so that no nook went untouched. We then took a walk upstairs and bought her a new collar, harness, leash and a few toys. 

***

If you are interested in adopting this 8.5 pound, around 2-year-old girl, please fill out an adoption application at www.projectrescuechicago.org . Once Ellen receives a clean bill of health from TAF’s vet, she will be spayed and ready for her new forever home.

A BIG thank you to Kelli from Mutt Hutt and to all of the staff at HEAL for seeing Ellen with no appointment and for the extra TLC that you all gave her! Without all of you, this baby girl would not be sleeping on the couch next to me tonight!

Ellen looks like a sweet dog who now has a second chance at life. Click here for more information and photos of Ellen, here for more about the Mutt Hutt, and here for adoption information at Project Rescue Chicago. (Photos from the Trio Animal Foundation) 

benjislife12:

Someone is at the door ma!
Wait a minute was that you knocking on the wall ?

Tags: dog

"SUSIE’S HOPE" FILM TO BE BROADCAST ON AUGUST 3RD - An extraordinary story based on true events, Susie’s Hope follows a family who triumphs over tragedy and changes lives in their commuity. A survivor of a horrific pit bull attack, Donna Lawrence, adopts a pit bull-mix puppy, Susie, that has been beaten, set on fire and left for dead.”

A film about a rescued Pit Bull named Susie called “Susie’s Hope” will be broadcast on the UP television network on August 3rd.  In 2009 Susie, a Pit Bull/Shepherd mix, was discovered in a North Carolina park with her ears burned off and over 300 maggots on her body. Amazingly, she survived and was adopted by a woman named Donna Lawrence who happened to be a survivor of an attack by a Pit Bull. Susie and Donna have inspired a law concerning animal abuse and have been campaigning to spread awareness about animal abuse and pet care. Now, a film based on Susie’s experience will be broadcast on national TV.  Click here for more about Susie, her work, and about the film.   

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE PUGS

MEMORIAL EVENT FOR 70TH ANNIVERSARY OF HERO DOG’S DEATH - "A delegation from Norway, who view the St Bernard as a national hero, will be taking part in the event, which will see a parade of St Bernards as well a pipe band and a wreath laying ceremony and bugle playing the Last Post."

A Saint Bernard named Bamse was a registered crew member and the mascot for the Royal Norwegian Navy during World War II. He was known for his loyal service and for saving the life of a sailor that had fallen overboard. Bamse was also well known in Scotland because his ship had been stationed there. A memorial service commemorating the 70th anniversary of his death will be held in Montrose, Scotland on July 21st. Read more from The Scotsman:

Not only did this courageous canine leap into the water to rescue a sailor who had fallen overboard, but he also knocked over a knifeman who was trying to attack a young lieutenant while stationed in Scotland – acts of bravery that earned him the animal’s George Cross.

Tomorrow, hundreds of Bamse fans will gather in Montrose, where he is buried, to mark the 70th anniversary of the death of the hero sea dog – for what is expected to be the final time.

A delegation from Norway, who view the St Bernard as a national hero, will be taking part in the event, which will see a parade of St Bernards as well a pipe band and a wreath laying ceremony and bugle playing the Last Post.

Norwegian ships have brought people to Montrose to visit Bamse’s grave every ten years since the end of the war – and this year Vigdis Haftoe, whose father owned Bamse, will join the delegation as well as the mayor of Honningsvab, a Norweigan fishing town where the was born.

***

The story of Bamse started in Norway in September 1939 when his owner, Erling Haftoe, skipper of the minesweeper Thorodd took him onboard his ship as a pet. However, the dog became such a valuable companion to the crew that months later he became a registered crew member, with his own ration book.

Bamse arrived in Britain in 1940 on one of the ships in the Royal Norwegian Navy flotilla that carried King Hakon VII and his government into exile following the annexation of Norway by the Nazis. Two years later, he was posted to Montrose when Haftoe, a naval captain, took command of the Thorodd, a minesweeper in the Norwegian navy.

The giant dog of war quickly captured the hearts of locals as his unwavering devotion and courage under fire made him a legend among the thousands of Norwegian sailors, soldiers and airmen in the Allied forces.

Bamse was an amazing dog who inspired many people. Click here for the full story. (Additional information and photos from the Montrose Heritage Trust)

DOG TRAVELS FOUR MILES EVERY NIGHT TO BRING BAGS OF FOOD BACK HOME - “Each night this junkyard dog in Brazil walks for miles along a danger fraught road to get food for his extended animal family.”

A stray dog in Brazil named Lilica lives in a junkyard with other dogs and assorted animals. One day, a woman named Lucia Helena de Souza gave a bag of food to Lilica and watched him walk away. Since then, Lilica has returned every night for the past three years to get a bag of food. It turns out that Lilica has been making the four mile trip in order to bring food back to share it with other stray animals at the junkyard. Truly an amazing story. (Information from the Daily Mail)

BOY WINS SCHOLARSHIP FOR CREATING “LOST DOG” NETWORK - “Chance hopes to continue running the Facebook page for as long as possible, and to continue increasing his audience with more likes.”
An 11-year-old boy named Chance Hampton recently won a scholarship from Kohl’s Cares for creating a Facebook page for lost dogs. The page, titled I Lost My Dog - Bothell, WA,  posts information and pictures of lost dogs in the hopes of reuniting them with their families. Apparently, Hampton was inspired to create the network after seeing lost dog flyers posted around his neighborhood in Bothell, Washington. Read more about the project from the Bothell Reporter:

When 11-year-old Chance Hampton saw a “lost dog” sign posted in his local neighborhood in Bothell last April, he decided to do something about it.
That’s how the “I Lost My Dog – Bothell” Facebook page was born. Chance said he wanted to do something for the people in his community to make it easier for them to “find their dogs, or help someone else’s dog find its way home.”
Chance’s parents, Kelly and Jason, fully supported Chance’s idea.
“I thought it was a great idea and I wanted to encourage him to do this. It’s good for him and good for the community,” Kelly said.
Chance and his parents decided that a Facebook page would be the best way to get the word out to people since it’s more community-oriented. He said that the information on his page is gathered from a combination of people posting on the page and other sources, like the local animal shelter.

Congratulations to Chance for his great idea that will help many dogs and their families. Click here for the full story and here to visit and “Like” the I Lost My Dog Facebook page. (Photo from the I Lost My Dog Smore site)

BOY WINS SCHOLARSHIP FOR CREATING “LOST DOG” NETWORK - Chance hopes to continue running the Facebook page for as long as possible, and to continue increasing his audience with more likes.

An 11-year-old boy named Chance Hampton recently won a scholarship from Kohl’s Cares for creating a Facebook page for lost dogs. The page, titled I Lost My Dog - Bothell, WA,  posts information and pictures of lost dogs in the hopes of reuniting them with their families. Apparently, Hampton was inspired to create the network after seeing lost dog flyers posted around his neighborhood in Bothell, Washington. Read more about the project from the Bothell Reporter:

When 11-year-old Chance Hampton saw a “lost dog” sign posted in his local neighborhood in Bothell last April, he decided to do something about it.

That’s how the “I Lost My Dog – Bothell” Facebook page was born. Chance said he wanted to do something for the people in his community to make it easier for them to “find their dogs, or help someone else’s dog find its way home.”

Chance’s parents, Kelly and Jason, fully supported Chance’s idea.

“I thought it was a great idea and I wanted to encourage him to do this. It’s good for him and good for the community,” Kelly said.

Chance and his parents decided that a Facebook page would be the best way to get the word out to people since it’s more community-oriented. He said that the information on his page is gathered from a combination of people posting on the page and other sources, like the local animal shelter.

Congratulations to Chance for his great idea that will help many dogs and their families. Click here for the full story and here to visit and “Like” the I Lost My Dog Facebook page. (Photo from the I Lost My Dog Smore site)

SOLDIERS SAVE TWO PUPPIES WHILE ON PATROL - “As the men proceeded to shoot the puppies one by one, U.S. forces swiftly intervened, rescuing two surviving puppies and taking them to a base camp where they would be raised as comrades.”
Two puppies, now named Rommel and Blitz, were saved in Afghanistan by a U.S. special forces unit who prevented the them from being shot by a group of men. Rommel and Blitz lost their mother and other siblings, but the were saved just in time and taken back to base camp by the soldiers. An organization called Guardians of Rescue has arranged for Rommel and Blitz to be flown to the U.S. They will be reunited with one of the soldiers who saved them. Read more from Fox 32 News:

When a group of Afghan men were seen firing at the ground in a remote mountain region eight months ago, alarmed members of a U.S. elite special forces unit came upon a disturbing discovery: A female dog, shot dead, after giving birth to a litter of pups no more than a week old. As the men proceeded to shoot the puppies one by one, U.S. forces swiftly intervened, rescuing two surviving puppies and taking them to a base camp where they would be raised as comrades.
The dogs, Rommel and Blitz, were flown to the U.S. this week in an effort to reunite them with the elite special forces sergeant who saved them. The reunion is part of a broader initiative, led by the group “Guardians of Rescue,” to return the canines of war to the American troops who bonded with them during their time in Afghanistan.
"When we got there, we saw a few Afghanis standing around something and firing at the ground," recalled the sergeant, who now lives in Raleigh, N.C., and whose name cannot be revealed for security reasons.
"We could see an adult dog and figured that they were shooting the dog over and over again. When we got closer, we saw that the situation wasn’t what we expected. The corpse of a dog on the ground had a litter of puppies no more than a week old and they weren’t just shooting the mother but also shooting the pups," he said.
"It’s miraculous that these dogs lived."

Rommel and Blitz have new lives thanks to the soldiers who saved them. Best of luck as they begin their lives in the U.S. Click here for the full story, and click here for more about Guardians of Rescue. 

SOLDIERS SAVE TWO PUPPIES WHILE ON PATROL - As the men proceeded to shoot the puppies one by one, U.S. forces swiftly intervened, rescuing two surviving puppies and taking them to a base camp where they would be raised as comrades.”

Two puppies, now named Rommel and Blitz, were saved in Afghanistan by a U.S. special forces unit who prevented the them from being shot by a group of men. Rommel and Blitz lost their mother and other siblings, but the were saved just in time and taken back to base camp by the soldiers. An organization called Guardians of Rescue has arranged for Rommel and Blitz to be flown to the U.S. They will be reunited with one of the soldiers who saved them. Read more from Fox 32 News:

When a group of Afghan men were seen firing at the ground in a remote mountain region eight months ago, alarmed members of a U.S. elite special forces unit came upon a disturbing discovery: A female dog, shot dead, after giving birth to a litter of pups no more than a week old. As the men proceeded to shoot the puppies one by one, U.S. forces swiftly intervened, rescuing two surviving puppies and taking them to a base camp where they would be raised as comrades.

The dogs, Rommel and Blitz, were flown to the U.S. this week in an effort to reunite them with the elite special forces sergeant who saved them. The reunion is part of a broader initiative, led by the group “Guardians of Rescue,” to return the canines of war to the American troops who bonded with them during their time in Afghanistan.

"When we got there, we saw a few Afghanis standing around something and firing at the ground," recalled the sergeant, who now lives in Raleigh, N.C., and whose name cannot be revealed for security reasons.

"We could see an adult dog and figured that they were shooting the dog over and over again. When we got closer, we saw that the situation wasn’t what we expected. The corpse of a dog on the ground had a litter of puppies no more than a week old and they weren’t just shooting the mother but also shooting the pups," he said.

"It’s miraculous that these dogs lived."

Rommel and Blitz have new lives thanks to the soldiers who saved them. Best of luck as they begin their lives in the U.S. Click here for the full story, and click here for more about Guardians of Rescue. 

PIT BULL SAVES BOY FROM HOUSE FIRE -  ”A Southport boy is alive thanks to his pit bull that woke him up from a nap when his house caught fire.”
A two-year-old Pit Bull named Ace helped save the life of Nick Lamb, who had taken off his hearing aid to take a nap. A fire broke out in his house in Indiana but Lamb was unable to hear the smoke alarm. Thankfully, Ace ran to his owner and woke him up. Read more from Fox 59:

Nick Lamb, 13, was born without the ability to hear, so the smoke alarms couldn’t wake him up, but his two-and-a-half year old pit bull Ace did. This isn’t just a story about the bond between a boy and his dog.
“Comes in my room a lot, and likes to play with me, and then, we also play out in the backyard sometimes, too,” said Nick.
In Nick’s eyes, Ace is a hero.
“Yeah, he saved my life,” Nick said. “I love him a lot more.”
Nick had gone down for an afternoon nap Wednesday and took out his cochlear as he normally does before he goes to sleep, and he didn’t hear the smoke alarms beeping.
Ace did, and knew he had to get Nick’s attention.
“He came in my room and started licking my face and then I woke up because I thought he wanted to go out back or something,” he said.

Ace came through when he was needed the most. Click here for the full story and a news video. (Image from Fox 59)

PIT BULL SAVES BOY FROM HOUSE FIRE -  A Southport boy is alive thanks to his pit bull that woke him up from a nap when his house caught fire.”

A two-year-old Pit Bull named Ace helped save the life of Nick Lamb, who had taken off his hearing aid to take a nap. A fire broke out in his house in Indiana but Lamb was unable to hear the smoke alarm. Thankfully, Ace ran to his owner and woke him up. Read more from Fox 59:

Nick Lamb, 13, was born without the ability to hear, so the smoke alarms couldn’t wake him up, but his two-and-a-half year old pit bull Ace did. This isn’t just a story about the bond between a boy and his dog.

“Comes in my room a lot, and likes to play with me, and then, we also play out in the backyard sometimes, too,” said Nick.

In Nick’s eyes, Ace is a hero.

“Yeah, he saved my life,” Nick said. “I love him a lot more.”

Nick had gone down for an afternoon nap Wednesday and took out his cochlear as he normally does before he goes to sleep, and he didn’t hear the smoke alarms beeping.

Ace did, and knew he had to get Nick’s attention.

“He came in my room and started licking my face and then I woke up because I thought he wanted to go out back or something,” he said.

Ace came through when he was needed the most. Click here for the full story and a news video. (Image from Fox 59)

"FINDING ROVER" APP HELPS FIND LOST DOGS - In its test runs over the past year, Polimeno said, 200 dogs were recovered in the Bay Area and other locations.…”

An application called Finding Rover has been tested by shelters in the San Francisco area to help identify lost dogs. The app uses facial recognition software to match pictures of dogs with other photos taken elsewhere. The developers now hope to increase usage of Finding Rover across the U.S. Read more from the San Francisco Chronicle:

John Polimeno is a lifelong dog lover. He hates the idea of lost pooches. So he’s invented a smartphone app that he says will consign the world’s lost-dog problems to the pooper-scooper of history.

He calls it Finding Rover, and after testing it small scale over the past year with a startup team of developers in Oakland that he calls “barkaroos,” he’s spreading the free app nationwide.

The way it works is this: Use the app to take a picture of your dog, then log that picture into the www.findingrover.com database. Because of facial recognition technology Polimeno had specially developed, any other photo of your dog that’s taken with the app will instantly match the one in the database.

***

One of the last challenges they faced was how to get an antsy pooch to sit still for a photo, but they overcame that with what they call a “bark button.” Press it while you’re trying to get the dog to pose, and it makes the phone emit a high-pitched puppy squeal. Virtually every dog in earshot will immediately tilt its head and freeze. Snap.

This is a great new tool to help dogs return to their families. Hopefully the lost dogs will be willing to look directly at the camera. Click here for the full story and here for more about Finding Rover. (Photos from their Facebook page)