DOGS HELP KIDS IN ECUADOR COPE WITH CHEMOTHERAPY - "…she brings her dogs in on Wednesdays, and small miracles happen as the sick youngsters caress and cuddle the dogs. “The children smile, talk. They’re infused with life.”“
A volunteer has been taking her dogs for weekly visits to SOLCA Hospital in Quito, Ecuador to help kids deal with the stress of chemotherapy. There seems to be a noticeable difference after the kids spend time with the dogs.  Here’s more from ajc.com:

Pardo recalled a patient named Dana, a 7-year-old girl who took a special liking to Lancelot, a 15-month-old American cocker spaniel, before she died early this month.
"When she died, her parents told me: ‘You have no idea how my daughter had fun on Wednesdays,’" Pardo said.
When Pardo first started bringing dogs in 2005, they stayed in the hospital garden and played with children before chemotherapy treatments.
Over the next five years, statistics at the hospital showed that on Wednesdays, fewer children had to be kept over because of problems after chemotherapy. Doctors found that youngsters’ adrenaline levels rose from being with the dogs, boosting their resistance to chemo’s side effects.
So the hospital began allowing Pardo’s dogs to visit children in their beds. She and her husband have 18 dogs in all that they work with.

The positive effect of dogs on hospital patients has been well documented and this is yet another great example. Click here for the full story. (Photo by Dolores Ochoa) 

DOGS HELP KIDS IN ECUADOR COPE WITH CHEMOTHERAPY - "…she brings her dogs in on Wednesdays, and small miracles happen as the sick youngsters caress and cuddle the dogs. “The children smile, talk. They’re infused with life.”“

A volunteer has been taking her dogs for weekly visits to SOLCA Hospital in Quito, Ecuador to help kids deal with the stress of chemotherapy. There seems to be a noticeable difference after the kids spend time with the dogs.  Here’s more from ajc.com:

Pardo recalled a patient named Dana, a 7-year-old girl who took a special liking to Lancelot, a 15-month-old American cocker spaniel, before she died early this month.

"When she died, her parents told me: ‘You have no idea how my daughter had fun on Wednesdays,’" Pardo said.

When Pardo first started bringing dogs in 2005, they stayed in the hospital garden and played with children before chemotherapy treatments.

Over the next five years, statistics at the hospital showed that on Wednesdays, fewer children had to be kept over because of problems after chemotherapy. Doctors found that youngsters’ adrenaline levels rose from being with the dogs, boosting their resistance to chemo’s side effects.

So the hospital began allowing Pardo’s dogs to visit children in their beds. She and her husband have 18 dogs in all that they work with.

The positive effect of dogs on hospital patients has been well documented and this is yet another great example. Click here for the full story. (Photo by Dolores Ochoa)