PARALYZED DOGS WALK AGAIN THANKS TO NOSE CELL TRANSPLANTS - "Before the treatment we used to have to wheel Jasper round on a trolley because his back legs were useless. Now he whizzes around the house and garden and is able to keep up with the other dogs. It’s wonderful."
A 10-year-old Dachshund named Jasper has regained the use of his hind legs thanks to a nose cell transplant at the Cambridge University.  In addition to Jasper, a group of other dogs also became able to walk again. Here’s more from BBC News:

Many of the dogs that received the transplant showed considerable improvement and were able to walk on a treadmill with the support of a harness.
None of the control group regained use of its back legs.
The research was a collaboration between the MRC’s Regenerative Medicine Centre and Cambridge University’s Veterinary School.
Professor Robin Franklin, a regeneration biologist at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Stem Cell Institute and report co-author, said: ‘Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement.
"We’re confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries but that’s a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function. 

Although it is still early in the research process, this is exciting news for Jasper and other dogs. Perhaps someday these findings will help paralyzed humans walk as well. Click here for the full story.

PARALYZED DOGS WALK AGAIN THANKS TO NOSE CELL TRANSPLANTS - "Before the treatment we used to have to wheel Jasper round on a trolley because his back legs were useless. Now he whizzes around the house and garden and is able to keep up with the other dogs. It’s wonderful."

A 10-year-old Dachshund named Jasper has regained the use of his hind legs thanks to a nose cell transplant at the Cambridge University.  In addition to Jasper, a group of other dogs also became able to walk again. Here’s more from BBC News:

Many of the dogs that received the transplant showed considerable improvement and were able to walk on a treadmill with the support of a harness.

None of the control group regained use of its back legs.

The research was a collaboration between the MRC’s Regenerative Medicine Centre and Cambridge University’s Veterinary School.

Professor Robin Franklin, a regeneration biologist at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Stem Cell Institute and report co-author, said: ‘Our findings are extremely exciting because they show for the first time that transplanting these types of cell into a severely damaged spinal cord can bring about significant improvement.

"We’re confident that the technique might be able to restore at least a small amount of movement in human patients with spinal cord injuries but that’s a long way from saying they might be able to regain all lost function. 

Although it is still early in the research process, this is exciting news for Jasper and other dogs. Perhaps someday these findings will help paralyzed humans walk as well. Click here for the full story.