DOGS BEING TRAINED TO DETECT OVARIAN CANCER - “University of Pennsylvania’s Working Dog Center has started training three canines to sniff out the signature compound that indicates the presence of ovarian cancer.”
Three dogs at the Penn Vet Working Dog Center are being trained to sniff out ovarian cancer. A Springer Spaniel named McBaine, a German Shepherd named Tsunami, and a Labrador Retriever named Ohlin will help researchers develop tools to detect traces of the cancer. Read more from nbcphiladelphia.com:

Researchers trying to develop a diagnostic tool for ovarian cancer are hoping dogs’ keen sense of smell will lead them down the right path.
An early detection device that combines old-fashioned olfactory skills, chemical analysis and modern technology could lead to better survival rates for the disease, which is particularly deadly because it’s often not caught until an advanced stage.
Using blood and tissue samples donated by patients, the University of Pennsylvania’s Working Dog Center has started training three canines to sniff out the signature compound that indicates the presence of ovarian cancer.
If the animals can isolate the chemical marker, scientists at the nearby Monell Chemical Senses Center will work to create an electronic sensor to identify the same odorant.

These dogs are doing important work. Best of luck to them all. Click here for the full story and here for more about the Penn Vet Working Dog Center. (Photo by Matt Rourke)

DOGS BEING TRAINED TO DETECT OVARIAN CANCER - University of Pennsylvania’s Working Dog Center has started training three canines to sniff out the signature compound that indicates the presence of ovarian cancer.”

Three dogs at the Penn Vet Working Dog Center are being trained to sniff out ovarian cancer. A Springer Spaniel named McBaine, a German Shepherd named Tsunami, and a Labrador Retriever named Ohlin will help researchers develop tools to detect traces of the cancer. Read more from nbcphiladelphia.com:

Researchers trying to develop a diagnostic tool for ovarian cancer are hoping dogs’ keen sense of smell will lead them down the right path.

An early detection device that combines old-fashioned olfactory skills, chemical analysis and modern technology could lead to better survival rates for the disease, which is particularly deadly because it’s often not caught until an advanced stage.

Using blood and tissue samples donated by patients, the University of Pennsylvania’s Working Dog Center has started training three canines to sniff out the signature compound that indicates the presence of ovarian cancer.

If the animals can isolate the chemical marker, scientists at the nearby Monell Chemical Senses Center will work to create an electronic sensor to identify the same odorant.

These dogs are doing important work. Best of luck to them all. Click here for the full story and here for more about the Penn Vet Working Dog Center. (Photo by Matt Rourke)