angryvegan:

Dog in need of home. Can anyone help? Found him today in south Florida. He seems to be a stray. Doesn’t belong to anyone in my neighborhood. He is a sweetheart and good with other dogs. He looks like a black lab. He is very affectionate. If you know someone who can keep him please message me. I already have 4 dogs of my own and can’t keep him. He is very loving and playful.

angryvegan appears to have found a stray dog in need of a good home. Please contact angryvegan if you are in the Florida area. Please share!

angryvegan:

Dog in need of home. Can anyone help? Found him today in south Florida. He seems to be a stray. Doesn’t belong to anyone in my neighborhood. He is a sweetheart and good with other dogs. He looks like a black lab. He is very affectionate. If you know someone who can keep him please message me. I already have 4 dogs of my own and can’t keep him. He is very loving and playful.

angryvegan appears to have found a stray dog in need of a good home. Please contact angryvegan if you are in the Florida area. Please share!

FORMER BAIT DOG READY FOR ADOPTION - Pearl was found as a stray thought to be disposed of after serving her purpose as a bait dog. Her wounds, inside and out, have been healed, and she is ready to find a loving home.”

Pearl is believed to have been used as a “bait” dog.  Fortunately, she has been rescued and is now ready for adoption through the Fitchburg Animal Shelter in Massachusetts. Here’s more from the Sentinel & Enterprise:

Pearl has been introduced to a variety of playmates, showing her that she can have a positive relationship with other dogs. She is super playful, believing herself to be tug-of-war queen, and affectionate as can be.

She loves children and would do wonderfully with older children that can match her energy. Pearl will drop everything to get a hug and snuggle and loves nothing more than to follow you around learning about her new, safe world.

Despite her past, Pearl appears to be a sweet and loving dog. Any family would be lucky to have her as a companion. Read the full article at sentinelandenterprise.com.

A DOG JOURNAL INTERVIEW WITH DAVID PASZTOR FROM HARD LUCK HOUNDS
Mr. David Pasztor, founder of Hard Luck Hounds, was kind enough to answer a few questions regarding this wonderful rescue organization which is based out of Austin, Texas.  Hard Luck Hounds helps find permanent homes for dogs who are often overlooked in the adoption process and are the “longest-stay” dogs at the shelter. In addition to pairing up dogs with new families, volunteers provide a variety of services such as consultation and training to ensure that the dogs have the best adoption experience possible.  
First, can you please tell us how your organization, Hard Luck Hounds, got started?
Hard Luck Hounds started in the spring of 2011. Two dogs that were well liked by volunteers – Emily and Diamond – were euthanized. Their deaths crystallized long standing frustration among volunteers over adoptable dogs who were becoming stuck at the shelter for so long that their behavior deteriorated until they were put down. Although volunteers routinely fought at the last minute to save many of these dogs, there was no organized effort to target long stay dogs and work aggressively to find them homes before they faced immediate death.
What was the inspiration behind this project and why are you focusing specifically on “longest-stay” dogs?
We focus specifically on longest stay dogs because they need the most help, and are at greatest risk of ultimately being euthanized. The Austin shelter has distinguished itself by becoming the largest open intake No-Kill shelter in the country. That’s outstanding. But it also means that there is always a population of dogs that languish in their kennels for months on end without being adopted. Some have behavior or health issues, others are older dogs that tend to be passed over by adopters. If someone doesn’t actively market and advocate for these dogs, they will sit there forever.
Are there certain types of dogs that end up staying in shelters the longest and that are commonly passed over in favor of other dogs for adoption?
Absolutely. First and foremost are the so-called bully breeds. “Pit bull” and “Pit bull mix” have become generic classifications for any solid looking dog that even slightly resembles a Staffie  or bull terrier. This mythical breed designation is meaningless at this point, but it conjures the whole array of uninformed prejudice and fear that has come to surround “pit bulls.” Many people simply won’t consider adopting them. Many landlords and apartment complexes bar them. The ignorant myths about them refuse to die. So it’s always harder to find them homes.
Puppies, young dogs, purebreds, and fluffy dogs are fairly easy to get adopted. Older dogs are much harder. Dogs with medical issues are much harder, and heartworm positive dogs are challenging.
What methods and tools does Hard Luck Hounds use to promote dog adoption?
Our approach is basic customer service. In fact, we call it concierge service. We have volunteers at the shelter approaching customers, talking to them about their lives and asking what kind of dog they’re looking for. The key is trying to identify good matches. Very often, getting a long stay dog adopted is no more difficult than introducing them to an adopter who might otherwise have walked right by the kennel. We spend however much time it takes with an adopter answering questions, talking about dog care and training, and telling them everything we know about a specific dog.
If they decide to adopt, we offer full support to increase the chances of a successful match. We provide a free crate. We give vouchers for heartworm treatment and behavior training when appropriate. We check in after the adoption, and offer our version of tech support. Hard Luck Hounds adopters can call us anytime if they have questions about behavior, crate training, finding a vet near them, or just about anything. We try to engage them in an ongoing conversation after the adoption so we can keep track of how things are going, and make sure small bumps in the road don’t become huge obstacles that lead to a dog’s return.
I imagine that raising funds to help the dogs is a major headache for most rescue organizations.  What are some common obstacles you’ve encountered in your day-to-day operations?
We designed our program to be as cheap as possible, and the key to its success is volunteer hours as opposed to money. But we do need funds for crates and training costs. Austin is an animal-friendly, generous town, so we’ve been able to raise what we needed so far. But there are a lot of rescue and animal welfare groups in Austin – all doing good work – and can be hard to differentiate a specific group and what it is trying to do.
Finally, do you have any upcoming events you’d like to share?
On Oct. 13, we’ll be having our monthly Happy Hour and fundraiser at House Wine, and on Nov. 10 we’ll be marking the 1-year anniversary of the new Austin Animal Center. Information on both events is on our Hard Luck Hounds facebook page and our website, www.hardluckhounds.com.
Thanks again to Mr. Pasztor for telling us about this great organization. Click here to learn more about Hard Luck Hounds at their website. You can also “Like” their Facebook page or follow them on Twitter, and don’t forget to follow their Tumblr blog, hardluckhounds. A special thanks to shyfox for helping facilitate this interview!

A DOG JOURNAL INTERVIEW WITH DAVID PASZTOR FROM HARD LUCK HOUNDS

Mr. David Pasztor, founder of Hard Luck Hounds, was kind enough to answer a few questions regarding this wonderful rescue organization which is based out of Austin, Texas.  Hard Luck Hounds helps find permanent homes for dogs who are often overlooked in the adoption process and are the “longest-stay” dogs at the shelter. In addition to pairing up dogs with new families, volunteers provide a variety of services such as consultation and training to ensure that the dogs have the best adoption experience possible.  

First, can you please tell us how your organization, Hard Luck Hounds, got started?

Hard Luck Hounds started in the spring of 2011. Two dogs that were well liked by volunteers – Emily and Diamond – were euthanized. Their deaths crystallized long standing frustration among volunteers over adoptable dogs who were becoming stuck at the shelter for so long that their behavior deteriorated until they were put down. Although volunteers routinely fought at the last minute to save many of these dogs, there was no organized effort to target long stay dogs and work aggressively to find them homes before they faced immediate death.

What was the inspiration behind this project and why are you focusing specifically on “longest-stay” dogs?

We focus specifically on longest stay dogs because they need the most help, and are at greatest risk of ultimately being euthanized. The Austin shelter has distinguished itself by becoming the largest open intake No-Kill shelter in the country. That’s outstanding. But it also means that there is always a population of dogs that languish in their kennels for months on end without being adopted. Some have behavior or health issues, others are older dogs that tend to be passed over by adopters. If someone doesn’t actively market and advocate for these dogs, they will sit there forever.

Are there certain types of dogs that end up staying in shelters the longest and that are commonly passed over in favor of other dogs for adoption?

Absolutely. First and foremost are the so-called bully breeds. “Pit bull” and “Pit bull mix” have become generic classifications for any solid looking dog that even slightly resembles a Staffie  or bull terrier. This mythical breed designation is meaningless at this point, but it conjures the whole array of uninformed prejudice and fear that has come to surround “pit bulls.” Many people simply won’t consider adopting them. Many landlords and apartment complexes bar them. The ignorant myths about them refuse to die. So it’s always harder to find them homes.

Puppies, young dogs, purebreds, and fluffy dogs are fairly easy to get adopted. Older dogs are much harder. Dogs with medical issues are much harder, and heartworm positive dogs are challenging.

What methods and tools does Hard Luck Hounds use to promote dog adoption?

Our approach is basic customer service. In fact, we call it concierge service. We have volunteers at the shelter approaching customers, talking to them about their lives and asking what kind of dog they’re looking for. The key is trying to identify good matches. Very often, getting a long stay dog adopted is no more difficult than introducing them to an adopter who might otherwise have walked right by the kennel. We spend however much time it takes with an adopter answering questions, talking about dog care and training, and telling them everything we know about a specific dog.

If they decide to adopt, we offer full support to increase the chances of a successful match. We provide a free crate. We give vouchers for heartworm treatment and behavior training when appropriate. We check in after the adoption, and offer our version of tech support. Hard Luck Hounds adopters can call us anytime if they have questions about behavior, crate training, finding a vet near them, or just about anything. We try to engage them in an ongoing conversation after the adoption so we can keep track of how things are going, and make sure small bumps in the road don’t become huge obstacles that lead to a dog’s return.

I imagine that raising funds to help the dogs is a major headache for most rescue organizations.  What are some common obstacles you’ve encountered in your day-to-day operations?

We designed our program to be as cheap as possible, and the key to its success is volunteer hours as opposed to money. But we do need funds for crates and training costs. Austin is an animal-friendly, generous town, so we’ve been able to raise what we needed so far. But there are a lot of rescue and animal welfare groups in Austin – all doing good work – and can be hard to differentiate a specific group and what it is trying to do.

Finally, do you have any upcoming events you’d like to share?

On Oct. 13, we’ll be having our monthly Happy Hour and fundraiser at House Wine, and on Nov. 10 we’ll be marking the 1-year anniversary of the new Austin Animal Center. Information on both events is on our Hard Luck Hounds facebook page and our website, www.hardluckhounds.com.

Thanks again to Mr. Pasztor for telling us about this great organization. Click here to learn more about Hard Luck Hounds at their website. You can also “Like” their Facebook page or follow them on Twitter, and don’t forget to follow their Tumblr blog, hardluckhounds. A special thanks to shyfox for helping facilitate this interview!

CHOPPER FINDS A HOME - "There’s a happy ending for one of the dogs injured when an Attica animal shelter was broken into and animals were forced to fight each other."
A dog named Chopper has been adopted from the Paws and Claws Animal Shelter in Attica, Indiana. Last month, someone broke into the shelter and forced Chopper and another dog to fight each other. Fortunately, Chopper has recovered from his scary experience and has been adopted by a local family.  Here’s more from wfli.com:

After spending more than a year in Attica’s Paws and Claws Animal Shelter, Chopper was adopted and taken home Monday evening…when the family met the ever-so-friendly Chopper, they knew he was the one. At first, the family didn’t know that Chopper was one of the two dogs forced to fight during a break-in last month at the shelter. And although Chopper was leaving with some stitches still in, the family’s determined to give him a loving, caring future.
***
Flynn, the other dog forced to fight, still needs the community’s help. He’s is still up for adoption at Paws and Claws.

I hope that the people responsible for the break-in are brought to justice, and it’s great to hear that Chopper finally has a permanent home.  Hopefully the other dog, Flynn, also finds a home too. Click here for the full story from WLFI.

CHOPPER FINDS A HOME - "There’s a happy ending for one of the dogs injured when an Attica animal shelter was broken into and animals were forced to fight each other."

A dog named Chopper has been adopted from the Paws and Claws Animal Shelter in Attica, Indiana. Last month, someone broke into the shelter and forced Chopper and another dog to fight each other. Fortunately, Chopper has recovered from his scary experience and has been adopted by a local family.  Here’s more from wfli.com:

After spending more than a year in Attica’s Paws and Claws Animal Shelter, Chopper was adopted and taken home Monday evening…when the family met the ever-so-friendly Chopper, they knew he was the one. At first, the family didn’t know that Chopper was one of the two dogs forced to fight during a break-in last month at the shelter. And although Chopper was leaving with some stitches still in, the family’s determined to give him a loving, caring future.

***

Flynn, the other dog forced to fight, still needs the community’s help. He’s is still up for adoption at Paws and Claws.

I hope that the people responsible for the break-in are brought to justice, and it’s great to hear that Chopper finally has a permanent home.  Hopefully the other dog, Flynn, also finds a home too. Click here for the full story from WLFI.

Submission from the-tiny-one.  Great picture, great story, and a great dog!
My family adopted Yoda when I was seven years old. When we got him he was smaller than a coke can and very sickly,  he didn’t know how to drink water or take care of himself. The first time that we took him to the vet they told us to put him down because they said he had water on the brain and was going to die in less than a month but we decided to try and save him. I’m glad we did because we’ve had him for eleven years now. He’s a great little guy and I’m  happy everyday that adopted him. 

Submission from the-tiny-one.  Great picture, great story, and a great dog!

My family adopted Yoda when I was seven years old. When we got him he was smaller than a coke can and very sickly,  he didn’t know how to drink water or take care of himself. The first time that we took him to the vet they told us to put him down because they said he had water on the brain and was going to die in less than a month but we decided to try and save him. I’m glad we did because we’ve had him for eleven years now. He’s a great little guy and I’m  happy everyday that adopted him. 

vwcampervan-aldridge:

We spent the afternoon walking dogs from the Rosedene Dog Rescue centre - it’s heartbreaking to see the dogs in their Kennels waiting for someone to come along and choose them to rehome. Little dogs like Gizmo here will soon be rehomed, but old dogs and Staffordshire Bull Terriers get left behind.
If you know of anyone thinking of a dog - a rehomed rescue dog is the best option!

I wish I could adopt all the dogs in the world.  Please give consideration to older dogs and bully breeds if you choose to adopt.

vwcampervan-aldridge:

We spent the afternoon walking dogs from the Rosedene Dog Rescue centre - it’s heartbreaking to see the dogs in their Kennels waiting for someone to come along and choose them to rehome. Little dogs like Gizmo here will soon be rehomed, but old dogs and Staffordshire Bull Terriers get left behind.

If you know of anyone thinking of a dog - a rehomed rescue dog is the best option!

I wish I could adopt all the dogs in the world.  Please give consideration to older dogs and bully breeds if you choose to adopt.

lachicafeliz:

Adoption. It’s a weird concept, no? But it’s a great one nonetheless.

I adopted a dog not too long ago, at the Santa Cruz SPCA. My mother and I had did it on a whim. Sometimes the best decisions are the ones you put no thought into, because to simply put it, you’re doing it from your heart.

This sums up the joy of dog adoption very nicely.  

BASEBALL PITCHER TIM LINCECUM HELPS SENIOR DOG GET ADOPTED - "Tim is a huge animal lover…He thought about becoming a zoologist, but he decided he would play baseball instead."
San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum has teamed up with a rescue organization called Muttville Senior Dog Rescue to promote the adoption of older dogs.  Recently, a dog named Timmy accompanied Lincecum to the baseball field to spread the word about senior dogs.  Thanks to this event, Timmy will soon be adopted into a permanent home.  Here’s more from the SF Weekly:

You might have watched the game last week when Lincecum appeared on field before the first-pitch against the Cincinnati Reds, with Timmy — an elderly mixed terrier, in tow. This was Lincecum’s way of drawing attention away from his bad pitching streak and toward this 11-year-old pup whoreallyneeds a home.

And it worked! 

"He’s definitely on his road to adoption," says Sherri Franklin, the executive director of Muttsville Senior Dog Rescue, the nonprofit that houses Timmy, and 70 other senior citizen dogs.
Timmy currently has three potential parents who are interested in taking him home after spotting him on the mound at AT&T Park. 

Older dogs typically have a harder time being adopted, so it’s great to see stories like this.  It appears that Timmy will spend the rest of his years with a loving family.  Click here for the full story, and here to learn more about Muttsville Senior Dog Rescue.

BASEBALL PITCHER TIM LINCECUM HELPS SENIOR DOG GET ADOPTED - "Tim is a huge animal lover…He thought about becoming a zoologist, but he decided he would play baseball instead."

San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum has teamed up with a rescue organization called Muttville Senior Dog Rescue to promote the adoption of older dogs.  Recently, a dog named Timmy accompanied Lincecum to the baseball field to spread the word about senior dogs.  Thanks to this event, Timmy will soon be adopted into a permanent home.  Here’s more from the SF Weekly:

You might have watched the game last week when Lincecum appeared on field before the first-pitch against the Cincinnati Reds, with Timmy — an elderly mixed terrier, in tow. This was Lincecum’s way of drawing attention away from his bad pitching streak and toward this 11-year-old pup whoreallyneeds a home.
And it worked! 
"He’s definitely on his road to adoption," says Sherri Franklin, the executive director of Muttsville Senior Dog Rescue, the nonprofit that houses Timmy, and 70 other senior citizen dogs.
Timmy currently has three potential parents who are interested in taking him home after spotting him on the mound at AT&T Park. 
Older dogs typically have a harder time being adopted, so it’s great to see stories like this.  It appears that Timmy will spend the rest of his years with a loving family.  Click here for the full story, and here to learn more about Muttsville Senior Dog Rescue.
Submission from shelter-dog-photos.  Wonderful story.  Thank you for taking Buddy into your family.
This is Buddy, but I can him “B”. He’s a 7-year-old rescue poodle. He’s actually my parents’ dog, but I take care of him a lot so I hope that counts. After the dog I’d grown up with passed away from bladder cancer, my parents started looking to adopt a new dog, but weren’t having any luck. My mom likes small dogs and my dad has allergies, so it had to be a small dog with poodle-type hair. I got on Craigslist and the second link I clicked on was B. His owner was going into a nursing home and couldn’t keep him. A rescue organization as trying to find a home for him, but nobody wanted to adopt B because he was shy and shook like a leaf around strangers. If he didn’t find a home by the end of the week, he would have to go to a shelter, possibly a high kill shelter. I knew right away he was a perfect fit and my parents adopted him that week. I’ve never been able to have a dog in any of the apartments I’ve lived in, so I spend as much time with B as I can. I like to joke that he’s really my dog because I found him. I teach him tricks and we play games where I hide treats and he has to sniff them out. He has really come out of his shell and is a sweet, gentle, funny dog, and, as you can tell from this picture, he loves belly rubs! -Jenna

Submission from shelter-dog-photos.  Wonderful story.  Thank you for taking Buddy into your family.

This is Buddy, but I can him “B”. He’s a 7-year-old rescue poodle. He’s actually my parents’ dog, but I take care of him a lot so I hope that counts. After the dog I’d grown up with passed away from bladder cancer, my parents started looking to adopt a new dog, but weren’t having any luck. My mom likes small dogs and my dad has allergies, so it had to be a small dog with poodle-type hair. I got on Craigslist and the second link I clicked on was B. His owner was going into a nursing home and couldn’t keep him. A rescue organization as trying to find a home for him, but nobody wanted to adopt B because he was shy and shook like a leaf around strangers. If he didn’t find a home by the end of the week, he would have to go to a shelter, possibly a high kill shelter. I knew right away he was a perfect fit and my parents adopted him that week. I’ve never been able to have a dog in any of the apartments I’ve lived in, so I spend as much time with B as I can. I like to joke that he’s really my dog because I found him. I teach him tricks and we play games where I hide treats and he has to sniff them out. He has really come out of his shell and is a sweet, gentle, funny dog, and, as you can tell from this picture, he loves belly rubs! -Jenna

Submission from mazzietakesmanhattan.  Amazing photo!  Thank you for providing her with a second chance at life.
Meet Mazzie, my 3+ year old Black Lab mix.  Born in rural Georgia, she has lived with me in New York City’s West Village for almost 3 years now. 
As a big, black dog in the South, my girl’s chances of survival, much less finding a loving home, were pretty much nonexistent.  Somehow, she beat the odds and was spared from certain death thanks to the Chattahoochee Veterinary Hospital in Roswell, GA  — the staff there housed, cared for and loved her until they could secure her transport up north — and Puppy Pipeline Rescue of GA, which drove her to Animal Haven, a no-kill shelter in New York City.  I remain so incredibly grateful that these kind and generous people decided that she deserved a second chance.
Adjusting to New York City was not an easy process for Mazzie and she spent most of her early days in a pretty scared and confused state.  But Mazzie is not one to give up and instead of throwing in the proverbial towel, she worked long and hard with a behaviorist to become acclimated to the novel sights, sounds and smells of her new hometown.  As a result, she is now the consummate city girl and a West Village celebrity (you can follow her (mis)adventures atwww.mazzietakesmanhattan.com). 
While she certainly has beauty, brains, charm and wit, the most awesome things about Mazzie are her indomitable will (she can be very hard headed!), spirit and zest for life.  She reminds me every day how important it is to stick to my guns, live in the moment, seize the day and be passionate about my pursuits (although I don’t think I’ll ever be as passionate about anything as she is about stalking squirrels in the city parks).

Submission from mazzietakesmanhattan.  Amazing photo!  Thank you for providing her with a second chance at life.

Meet Mazzie, my 3+ year old Black Lab mix.  Born in rural Georgia, she has lived with me in New York City’s West Village for almost 3 years now. 

As a big, black dog in the South, my girl’s chances of survival, much less finding a loving home, were pretty much nonexistent.  Somehow, she beat the odds and was spared from certain death thanks to the Chattahoochee Veterinary Hospital in Roswell, GA  — the staff there housed, cared for and loved her until they could secure her transport up north — and Puppy Pipeline Rescue of GA, which drove her to Animal Haven, a no-kill shelter in New York City.  I remain so incredibly grateful that these kind and generous people decided that she deserved a second chance.

Adjusting to New York City was not an easy process for Mazzie and she spent most of her early days in a pretty scared and confused state.  But Mazzie is not one to give up and instead of throwing in the proverbial towel, she worked long and hard with a behaviorist to become acclimated to the novel sights, sounds and smells of her new hometown.  As a result, she is now the consummate city girl and a West Village celebrity (you can follow her (mis)adventures atwww.mazzietakesmanhattan.com). 

While she certainly has beauty, brains, charm and wit, the most awesome things about Mazzie are her indomitable will (she can be very hard headed!), spirit and zest for life.  She reminds me every day how important it is to stick to my guns, live in the moment, seize the day and be passionate about my pursuits (although I don’t think I’ll ever be as passionate about anything as she is about stalking squirrels in the city parks).

Submission from shyfox. Jasper is a handsome dog.  Yet another example of why we should always rescue and adopt.
This is my baby boy & pride ‘n joy, Jasper.
He is a 2 year old border collie mix. He is a therapy dog, service dog, and knows about 76 different tricks. He is too smart for his own good; he has been caught mimicking human facial expressions and using commands he knows to communicate, although he almost never barks for any reason. 
I rescued Jasper (and his littermate) from a high-kill gassing shelter when he was 7 weeks old. He was emaciated, matted, covered in dime-sized ticks and fleas, and ridden with intestinal parasites. He and his entire litter were meant to be all put down the day I adopted him, and I’m so glad I made the decision to rescue. 
Jasper and I encourage people to rescue, because many people seem to be under the impression that you can only get cute, well behaved puppies from breeders. Their minds are usually changed when they meet Jasper. :) 
The picture of him was take on his second birthday, which was this April. Yes, he is wearing a bow tie. He likes being dressed up. 

Submission from shyfox. Jasper is a handsome dog.  Yet another example of why we should always rescue and adopt.

This is my baby boy & pride ‘n joy, Jasper.

He is a 2 year old border collie mix. He is a therapy dog, service dog, and knows about 76 different tricks. He is too smart for his own good; he has been caught mimicking human facial expressions and using commands he knows to communicate, although he almost never barks for any reason. 

I rescued Jasper (and his littermate) from a high-kill gassing shelter when he was 7 weeks old. He was emaciated, matted, covered in dime-sized ticks and fleas, and ridden with intestinal parasites. He and his entire litter were meant to be all put down the day I adopted him, and I’m so glad I made the decision to rescue. 

Jasper and I encourage people to rescue, because many people seem to be under the impression that you can only get cute, well behaved puppies from breeders. Their minds are usually changed when they meet Jasper. :) 

The picture of him was take on his second birthday, which was this April. Yes, he is wearing a bow tie. He likes being dressed up. 

ACTRESSES PROMOTE DOG ADOPTION IN INDIA - “Nearly a hundred rescued Indian puppies, scrubbed clean, satin ribbon around their necks, waited for a chance to be adopted.” 

Unfortunately I am not familiar with their work, but actresses Amala Akkineni, Trisha Krishnan and Anuja Iyer recently appeared at an event in India to encourage adoption and discourage the purchase of dogs from irreputable breeders.  India has a large population of stray dogs so such efforts are very important.  Here’s more from thehindu.com:

A little later in the evening, the rescued animals shared the spotlight with celebrities Amala Akkineni, Trisha Krishnan and Anuja Iyer, who support the cause of homeless pet adoption. Amala inaugurated the city’s first Humane Education Centre and spoke about the importance of adopting local breeds. “Indian breeds are really hardy; except for their annual vaccinations and their spay neuter surgeries, my Indian dogs have never needed to go to a vet”, she said.

Actor Trisha Krishnan spoke up against the breeding industry. “Give a home to a puppy that needs one. Don’t support the breeding industry, when there are so many homeless pups on the street”. The actor added that her own dog Cadbury was rescued from the street. “Having an Indian dog is such a boon. They make great guard dogs, and are extremely loyal. I’m speaking from experience”

It’s great to see people around the world working to spread awareness about the benefits of dog adoption. The event was promoted by the Blue Cross of India, which has been promoting animal welfare in India since 1964.  Click here for the full story and here for more information about Blue Cross of India.  

DOG SAVED FROM EGYPTIAN SHELTER HAS A BIG HEART - "In a shelter of 700 dogs fighting over food, she watched as Tyson sat back from the pack, letting all of the other dogs eat before he got his share."
A 5-year-old Boxer named Tyson was rescued from an Egyptian dog shelter and currently lives with his owner in Kentucky. He turned out to be very gentle with a big heart, and was subsequently trained and registered as a service dog. Tyson often does good deeds.  Here’s more from maysville-online.com:

Castelli said that she and Tyson were taking one of their regular routes down Cox Alley when the dog began pulling her off the road…It was there that Castelli found a denim pocketbook that had clearly been picked through, showing that theft had likely occurred…Using the address from the I.D., Castelli and Tyson made their way to the owner’s home.
The owner followed Castelli back to the purse, and was overjoyed that it had been found…Tyson’s behavior is not surprising. She said that on one of their recent walks, Tyson spotted a small dog locked in a hot car, soaking with sweat from the heat. He refused to leave until Castelli spoke to the owner. Castelli said he is also friendly with all of the neighbors.
"He loves children. If they scream [when playing] he thinks they’re hurt," she said. "He’s got a big heart."
Tyson is also a registered U.S. Service Dog, and can be used for therapy — he has the badge to prove it. Castelli said that in the past, Tyson helped her mother by pulling her in a wheelchair. He also helps Castelli, who sometimes has panic attacks, remain calm.

Tyson has traveled very far to get where he is today but it seems that he has more than repaid his owner by helping her get through rough times.  Dogs can be very compassionate creatures. Click here for the full story.

DOG SAVED FROM EGYPTIAN SHELTER HAS A BIG HEART - "In a shelter of 700 dogs fighting over food, she watched as Tyson sat back from the pack, letting all of the other dogs eat before he got his share."

A 5-year-old Boxer named Tyson was rescued from an Egyptian dog shelter and currently lives with his owner in Kentucky. He turned out to be very gentle with a big heart, and was subsequently trained and registered as a service dog. Tyson often does good deeds.  Here’s more from maysville-online.com:

Castelli said that she and Tyson were taking one of their regular routes down Cox Alley when the dog began pulling her off the road…It was there that Castelli found a denim pocketbook that had clearly been picked through, showing that theft had likely occurred…Using the address from the I.D., Castelli and Tyson made their way to the owner’s home.

The owner followed Castelli back to the purse, and was overjoyed that it had been found…Tyson’s behavior is not surprising. She said that on one of their recent walks, Tyson spotted a small dog locked in a hot car, soaking with sweat from the heat. He refused to leave until Castelli spoke to the owner. Castelli said he is also friendly with all of the neighbors.

"He loves children. If they scream [when playing] he thinks they’re hurt," she said. "He’s got a big heart."

Tyson is also a registered U.S. Service Dog, and can be used for therapy — he has the badge to prove it. Castelli said that in the past, Tyson helped her mother by pulling her in a wheelchair. He also helps Castelli, who sometimes has panic attacks, remain calm.

Tyson has traveled very far to get where he is today but it seems that he has more than repaid his owner by helping her get through rough times.  Dogs can be very compassionate creatures. Click here for the full story.

Submission from dcuff:
This is Hank.  We adopted him 3 years ago from a local shelter.  He enjoys barking, eating, running, and cuddling.  

Submission from dcuff:

This is Hank.  We adopted him 3 years ago from a local shelter.  He enjoys barking, eating, running, and cuddling.  

DOG FOLLOWS SOLDIERS ON DAILY PATROLS AND IS ADOPTED - “The little dog always had their back, falling in behind the last soldier as the unit left the camp every day on patrol.”
A stray dog in Afghanistan named Gougoune made it a habit to follow Canadian Forces soldiers on their patrols.  She quickly became an unofficial mascot for the troops and followed the soldiers even through dangerous conditions.  Now, Gougoune has been adopted by one of the soldiers and is living in Canada.  Here’s more from the Edmonton Journal:
Tail wagging, nose to the ground, she never strayed far from the men and women in uniform, occasionally lifting her face to capture a scent carried by the arid wind of the Afghanistan desert. Every day she returned with them, ate her fill, then curled into a tight ball to sleep, waiting for the morning to do it all again.
“The fact that she made it through all those patrols in one piece is pretty impressive,” says Erin Mather.

***
The dog wandered into camp one day shortly after Mather’s arrival and never left. Clearly malnourished and abused, and obviously feral, the dog didn’t let anyone close at first, but she was never far away, either, and always accompanied the soldiers on patrol. She had a penchant for making off with people’s flip-flops, which earned her the French name for the word, Gougoune (pronounced Ga-goon).

Gougoune found comfort with the soldiers, and they in turn found comfort in her.  She is now living happily in Canada with her new owner.  Click here for the full story. 

DOG FOLLOWS SOLDIERS ON DAILY PATROLS AND IS ADOPTED - The little dog always had their back, falling in behind the last soldier as the unit left the camp every day on patrol.”

A stray dog in Afghanistan named Gougoune made it a habit to follow Canadian Forces soldiers on their patrols.  She quickly became an unofficial mascot for the troops and followed the soldiers even through dangerous conditions.  Now, Gougoune has been adopted by one of the soldiers and is living in Canada.  Here’s more from the Edmonton Journal:

Tail wagging, nose to the ground, she never strayed far from the men and women in uniform, occasionally lifting her face to capture a scent carried by the arid wind of the Afghanistan desert. Every day she returned with them, ate her fill, then curled into a tight ball to sleep, waiting for the morning to do it all again.
“The fact that she made it through all those patrols in one piece is pretty impressive,” says Erin Mather.

***

The dog wandered into camp one day shortly after Mather’s arrival and never left. Clearly malnourished and abused, and obviously feral, the dog didn’t let anyone close at first, but she was never far away, either, and always accompanied the soldiers on patrol. She had a penchant for making off with people’s flip-flops, which earned her the French name for the word, Gougoune (pronounced Ga-goon).

Gougoune found comfort with the soldiers, and they in turn found comfort in her.  She is now living happily in Canada with her new owner.  Click here for the full story.